The annual “nispero” glut

ImageIn April and early May loquats, or “nísperos” as they’re called in Spanish, are in abundance. For the first couple of weeks after they become ripe enough to eat, kids and adults in my house make a daily pilgrimage to the terrace the loquat trees are on, returning 10 minutes later wiping the juice from their chins, but eventually the novelty wanes and usually there’s still half a tree heavy with fruit.

I have a bit of a phobia about waste. Any fruit that has already been attacked by insects either goes to the hens or the compost heap, but the rest has to be used.

The obvious favourite is to make jam. The loquat’s stones are perfect for jam-making so there is no need to buy artificial pectin. Furthermore, it’s a good substitute for apricot or peach jam which is frequently used for glazing cakes and sweets.

Loquat Jam: 1kg loquats, seeds removed but not peeled; 200ml water; finely grated rind and juice of 2 lemons; 1kg sugar.

Wash the fruit, remove the stones and wrap them in a piece of white cotton, tie the material to make a bag and suspend the bag in the pan. Chop the fruit to the size you like if you do not wish to use a blender on the jam. Simmer the fruit in the water until soft (about 20 minutes). Blend if you wish. Add the juice, rind and sugar. Boil rapidly until a little of the mix forms a “skin” on a cold saucer.  Warm your clean jars in the oven. Pour the jam into the jars and seal. I always use button-top jars from pasta sauces etc. which can be reused many times. Any jar where the button hasn’t sunk in hard needs to be kept in the fridge and used first. If the jar is correctly sealed, the jam can be kept in the store cupboard for a year.

However, there’s a limit to the amount of jam I can use so here are a couple of other ways of disposing of a nispero glut.Image

Loquat Upside-down Cake: 25 loquats; 2 eggs; 125ml natural yoghurt; 100ml milk; 250g butter; 250g self-raising flour; 100g brown sugar; 100g white sugar; 2tsp baking powder; 2 tsp vanilla extract; half tsp salt.

Heat the oven to 200ºC. Line a 22cm cake tin with baking paper or a cake liner. Melt half the butter with the brown sugar in a small pan. Cook for 2 minutes. Pour into the lined cake tin. Wash the loquats, cut them in half and remove the stones. Arrange them cut side down over the sugar/butter mixture. (I like to remove the skins to make the cake extra gunky, but you don’t have to). Mix the flour, white sugar, baking powder, salt, yoghurt, other half of the butter, milk, eggs and vanilla essence. Whip well. Pour the mixture gently over the loquats and bake for about 50 minutes until a knife comes out clean. Cool and then gently turn upside down onto a plate and remove the baking paper. Scrumptious hot, warm or cold.Image

Tropical Loquat Crumble:  1kg loquats; 100g sugar; 1 tbsp lemon juice. For the crumble: 50g plain flour; half tsp ground ginger; 75g rolled oats; 50g desiccated coconut; 25g ground almonds; 50g brown sugar; 75g melted butter.

Wash, halve and de-stone the loquats. Put them in a pan with the lemon juice and sugar. Cover and simmer gently for 25 minutes. Mix all the dry ingredients for the crumble and then stir in the melted butter. Spread the fruit in an ovenproof dish, top with the crumble and bake in the oven for about 20 minutes until the top is slightly browned.

If your family is unable to face another loquat by the end of the month, prepare the fruit as if you were making a crumble. Cool. Then place in plastic bags and freeze for use in pies and crumbles later in the year.

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Lemons galore!

The great thing about lemon trees is that certain types, such as Cuatro Estaciones (Four Seasons), will fruit several times a year so you will almost always be prepared for friends to drop in for a gin and tonic! Furthermore, citrus trees are perfect for the mini-gardener who only has space for trees in pots. Even small trees will regularly be bowed down with copious quantities of fruit on our island where the climate is so ideal for lemons and oranges.

In general, lemons keep better on the tree than off it, so there’s no need to rush to pick them every time they turn from green to yellow. However, if they are beginning to reach their sell-by date or a friendly neighbour hands you a large bagful over the garden wall, as mine regularly does, don’t panic. There are many ways of making use of even the biggest glut and not waste a drop of that wonderful vitamin C.Image

The quickest way of using the whole fruit is to remove the outermost layer of zest with a potato peeler and leave the thin strips to dry on a plate before converting them to powder with a blender and storing in an airtight jar. A spoonful of powder in hot water makes a refreshing drink and can also be added to herbal infusions.

Juice the lemons and freeze the juice in an ice tray for use with hot or cold water. A daily dose of lemon juice improves the immune system, is great for combating skin problems and is said to aid digestion and be helpful to those who want to lose a few pounds. However, don’t overdo it as the one unwanted side effect of excess vitamin C is increased flatulence.

If you also have some fresh dill or parsley available, you may wish to fill ice cube sections with chopped herbs and then top up with lemon juice for an instant dressing to be used on fish or salads.

For easy storage, pop the lemon cubes into a bag once they’re frozen.

If you enjoy lemon curd, nothing can beat making it fresh. Any of the jars that have button tops are suitable to wash out thoroughly and reuse. So long as the button “re-seals” and is hard when the curd cools, it will keep for several months in your store cupboard. Once opened jars should be refrigerated. Lemon curd is very versatile and can be used on toast, as a filling for cakes or as a speedy cheat when making lemon meringue pie, it’s also delicious stirred into natural yoghurt.

To make about 4 small pots you will need: the finely grated zest and juice of 3 lemons (for lime curd replace the lemons with 4 limes); 200g white sugar; 115g unsalted butter; 2 large eggs; 2 large egg yolks.

Method: place a Pyrex bowl above a pan of boiling water.  Put the lemon zest and juice, sugar and butter in the bowl. Stir occasionally until the sugar has dissolved and the butter has melted. Beat the eggs and yokes thoroughly until completely blended. Add the eggs to the lemon mixture while whisking. Stir slowly with a wooden spoon over a low heat and allow the curd to cook until it is thick and coats the back of the spoon. Meanwhile warm your clean jars and lids either in a low oven or weighted in hot water (so that the insides remain dry). Pour the curd into the warmed jars to within half a centimetre of the rim. Tighten their lids immediately and wait to hear the satisfying “pop” when they seal as they cool.

No blog on lemons would be complete for me without adding my friend, Beth’s, recipe for lemon snow. It’s been a favourite in our household for more than 30 years, for me, because it’s so quick and easy, while for everyone else it’s because it melts in your mouth.

Beth’s lemon snow has just three ingredients: A can of evaporated milk (chilled in the fridge for a few hours); a sachet of lemon jelly; 2 lemons.

Method: Dissolve the jelly in 250ml of boiling water. Leave to cool for 20minutes. Finely grate the zest from both lemons and add it with the juice to the jelly. Whip the evaporated milk until doubled in size then tip in the jelly/lemon mix and whip until fully blended. Pour the mixture into a glass bowl and chill until set.

Lemon trees require minimal attention on Mallorca. Trim out any dead wood and give them an iron-rich feed if the leaves begin to look pale in places. Although pot-housed trees require more frequent watering, once established in a garden, lemon trees only need extra water in the most extreme dry summers. Many other sites detail a myriad of ways you can employ the fruit to clean metal, negate unpleasant fridge smells and a host of other uses in addition to the culinary ones. A true super-fruit.