Courgettes and the dreaded wood louse …

Courgettes do well in Mallorca and I often end up berating myself for producing too many as they don’t freeze or store well, and by their final demise the family can be in open revolt about finding another one gracing the dinner table. In this situation it’s a godsend that the hens will happily feast on the excess so I can convince myself they’re not being wasted. To be honest, the hens are invaluable at soothing my conscience about “throwing away” all left-overs.Image

Back to the courgettes though, this year although the plants are very healthy, so are the wood lice. In fact every female wood louse within a kilometre radius appears to have told her friends that there’s a courgette patch close by ready for them to dump their collective off-spring in. As every big yellow bloom pokes its head out of the leaves, it’s instantly filled with tiny woodlice which start devouring the courgette as soon as it’s as long as a toothpick. I object to harvesting half-eaten vegetables so I’ve taken to picking them when I see the first signs of wiggling in the shrivelled flower, but the infestation still seems to be getting worse.

It goes against all the ideas of “knowing what’s in your food” to annihilate them with some devastating toxic mix of chemicals, so I consulted the internet for a remedy that allows me to feel “greenish” whilst still murdering them in their thousands.

The first information to pop up is that I should love my louse as, not only are they related to crabs and lobsters, but they act like earthworms in the garden by breaking down soil and compost. After that comes a post entitled: “How to look after a pet wood louse”. I am beginning to feel that my genocidal instincts are embarrassingly out of place.

But … there really are far too many of them for all of us to live in harmony, however useful they may be on the compost heap.

Finally, a post on how to kill! The wisdom seems to be to put in a drip watering system so that the ground is never damp, as they really like soggy soil. However, as a quick fix, put out boiled potatoes, orange shells and over-ripe strawberries on a damp newspaper. This banquet should lure the babies away from your courgettes, or other fruit and veg, during the night. In the morning roll up the heaving mass of squidgy news print and throw the whole thing in the hen house for them to breakfast upon, or on the compost heap if you’re feeling philanthropic.

I hope it works!

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